Stainless-steel earphones deliver polished sound

Review Date: October 31, 2014

The Good The well-crafted, uniquely designed stainless-steel RHA T10i earbuds sound great and come with an abundance of accessories, including three sets of acoustic filters, 10 different eartips and a carrying case. You also get an Apple-friendly inline remote/microphone for making cell-phone calls.

The Bad They’re a little weighty for in-ears and may not fit everyone comfortably. Some of the inline remote’s functions won’t work with Android and Windows Phone devices.

The Bottom Line While the design may not work for everyone, the RHA T10i earbuds are great-sounding and well-built, with some nice extras, including three sets of swappable acoustic filters.

Earphones are made out of all sorts of materials, but it’s not too often that you hear about metal injection-molded, stainless-steel ones, which is why RHA’s T10i model piqued our interest. They cost $199.95, £149.95 UK or €179.95 EUR (they’re not not available in Australia, but the US price translates to about AU$227.)

In case you’ve never heard of RHA, it’s a Scottish headphone maker, though its products are produced in the Far East, as most headphones are these days.

RHA says the stainless-steel T10i model features a handmade dynamic driver (model 770.1) “engineered to reproduce all genres of music with high levels of accuracy and detail.” It’s also interesting to note that the earphones include a tuning filter system that allows for frequency response customization. It’s a feature we’ve seen on a few in-ears in the past (the high-end Phonak Audeo PFE 232 comes with acoustic filters), but you don’t usually see it in a $200 headphone.

Everything about these seems well crafted — from the housings to the reinforced, oxygen-free copper cable to the gold-plated plug — and the sound is excellent, too. Factor in all the included accessories (RHA provides eartips in several different sizes and shapes along with a nice case), and you really feel like you’re getting a lot of headphone for your money.

The only potential problem is the fit. The T10i earbuds are somewhat weighty for in-ears and the over-the-ear cable system won’t appeal to everyone (I’m not a huge fan, while CNET audiophile Steve Guttenberg finds it more appealing).

The T10i’s cords are bendable at the top to allow them to wrap better around your ears. Sarah Tew/CNET

I had a little trouble maintaining a tight seal, especially when I hit the streets and walked around with the earphones in. They were fairly comfortable, but I found myself regularly adjusting them in my ears. Also, the cords are fairly heavy, too. I was always aware the cord was there. Ideally, you want to forget you’re wearing headphones.

Part of the cord weight is due to the inline remote. It’s sleek and sturdy, but it’s got a little heft to it. The remote works with iPhones, controlling music transport and volume; don’t expect them to work with Android and Windows Phone devices. Note, though, that the RHA T10 is also available, sans remote, for $10 or £10 cheaper.

Performance

Source: Stainless-steel earphones deliver polished sound

Post author

Dustin Gurley is an Designer, Developer, Artist, Instructor, Critical Theorist and Systems Engineer. He has an extensive background working professionally with 2D/2.5D/3D Motion Graphics, Compositing, Film, Video, Photography and client-side performance techniques as it pertains to web development. Dustin recently completed work on his Master of Fine Art degree in Motion Media Design (Motion Graphics) from the Savannah College of Art and Design. Prior to beginning his graduate work, Dustin obtained a Bachelor of Art degree in Communication Studies with a concentration in Broadcast and Emerging Media from the University of North Carolina at Wilmington. In addition to design and modeling, Dustin enjoys toying with his view camera, working with scratch film, authoring media related material and contributing to various industry conferences. When not in front of a computer, Dustin can be found with his wife, Regina Everett Gurley. The couple enjoys dividing their time between their home just outside of Raleigh, North Carolina and the beautiful North Carolina coast. Currently, Dustin serves as the Lead Instructor of Internet Technologies for Wake Technical Community College in Raleigh, North Carolina.